Tag Archives: shop stuff

Just being lazy…

Not that there is anything in particular going on — I’ve been puttering around but haven’t been updating the blog simply due to time restrictions due to work. I’m traveling again, but may be done for the remainder of the year now.

I have more beer openers to do, the book case for kindergarten is still waiting on the sewing portion to get done and I am lining up a bunch of pen gifts for the holidays. I have not started design of the cabinetry my daughter has asked for specifically for her dining area (she want’s a coffee bar type set up). I will be using sketch-up in detail there again and hope to get into that very soon.

Oh, and we (I) may be setting up a hand tool club at the Leesburg Va Woodcraft. I expect that will happen after the start of the year. A bunch of things will happen then – including bench and toolbox construction classes as part of the change to the class line-ups. I’m going to spread out classes, I hope, to let folks expand across the year, rather than just having me repeat the same intro classes all the time…

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A pair of small bow saws… building a replacement

I had a small frame sawIMG_3440 from sometime back (from Gramercy Tools), that I had rushed through a build on (trying to shape it with power sanders) that was never really pretty. It did however work 100% so for several years now I’ve used it. The fact these break down with the removal of the suspension string and blade make them easy to pack in the tool box, so it’s a lot easier than porting the frame saw I finished a few weeks back. And these are for cutting curves, that was for re-sawing wide boards, so – not really a comparison hey?

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Building a ReSaw-Saw… from HTW semester 4

IMG_3370So a couple years back Shannon Rogers covered the creation of the Roubo style resaw frame saw in semester 4. And I purchased the metal and blades at that time and they’ve been moved around quite a bit since then. I recently got a spot between some projects, and decided to go ahead and do the Roubo style 4′ long, 4″ wide large saw to see how I can make do. I have lots of 8/4 cherry stock and my oldest daughter has asked for some wall units that would benefit from some book matched components. I figured since most of the stalk “could” be done on a bandsaw I’m covered if this doesn’t work out, but in the mean time it’s sure fun to try out these techniques. I’m pretty impressed to find out some manual operations are a lot faster than power tool operations – setup for hand tools is pretty easy sometimes, and sometimes a simple operation setup on the power tool is not.

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My Paring chisel – re(shape/sharpen)ed

The chisel that I rely heavily on when working up joinery is my paring chisel. It’s a 1 1/4″ Stanley SW chisel with the handle that fits into the shaft of the metal. That allows me to use the chisel handle that came with it… or the longer chisel handle that I turned a couple years back. The longer handle allows me more body control when I want it, and I favor that handle because I’m more comfortable with it.

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March Shop Tour

Another month gone buy, but only a bit of the changes in the shop have been completed. I had classes to teach and a project at work coming up on release, so I didn’t spend as much time cleaning up downstairs – yep the rec room is still way overloaded 🙂

New tool in the shop

I recently IMG_3004found a solution for use of the plane stop on my Nicholson workbench. Since the plane stop is a 3×3″ block of maple that just protrudes above the surface, I can basically hold a piece of wood against the stop, and plane directly into the stop. All the pressure (like with bench dogs on my Roubo, etc.) holds the wood in place. What I found was that if I used the doe foot to brace a piece of wood against the wooden plane stop, the width is too wide to help trap that end in place. So, after several months of looking around, and reading Chris S. I found that the next part I wanted to try was a metal edge that would mount flush to the top of the stop, and just protrued a few teeth forward to brace the wood when working it with the does foot. Now keep in mind, that when I use the does foot, I’m really using it to help with traverse planing activity. This pushes across the grain, and is what allowed the stop end to slip a bit. I just received an insert that I picked up on eBay, so I’ve not yet tried it. I will be drilling a vertical hole in the top of one end of the stop (it’s a 5/8″ diameter post) to try this out. Really looking forward to this working and me not having to try to buy and shape a piece of steel!